Corovan Developers In The News

This page showcases a selection of news stories and articles we've encountered that are related to the companies working on the development project for the Corovan site, Walden Development and the Prado Group.


SF Tenants Crowd City Hall to Rally Against Evictions (Mission Local, April 27, 2014)

"Other event-goers included Mario Landau-Holdsworth and Liz Pettit, both fighting their eviction at an apartment at Haight and Fillmore. 'The building was just sold to Prado Group,' said Landau-Holdsworth. 'The old landlord didn't care very much about what was happening in the building. Now that's changed because Prado is just trying to make as much money as possible off of the units.' "


Cozy relationship between a UCSF Foundation board member and a bidder to build housing for the university

"Real estate tongues are wagging over the seemingly cozy relationship between a UCSF Foundation board member and one of the three finalists bidding for the rights to build housing on the university's 10-acre Laurel Heights campus.

A dozen offers were submitted last year, and recently UCSF pared down the list to three. The contenders haven't been publicly disclosed, but we're told one of the firms is the Prado Group, whose president and founder is Dan Safier.

His wife, Jackie Safier, sits on the board of the UCSF Foundation and until recently was a member of its real estate committee, which advises the university on all development deals.

UCSF spokeswoman Barbara French tells us that Jackie Safier last attended a real estate committee meeting in October 2012 - two months before the bids were issued - and resigned her committee post in May to avoid any appearance of impropriety."

Phillip Matier and Andrew Ross, SFGate.com, February 17, 2014 (Scroll down to "Small World")


How Clarion Alley Mural Project Met Developer Dan Safier and the Prado Group (Megan Wilson, November 28, 2013)

"This past summer a group of business execs, all clad in expensive black suits rolled into Clarion Alley with a camera crew. [...] As one of the artists painting on the alley that day and one of the organizers of the overall mural project, I casually approached the man who appeared to be in charge of the team of 1% interlopers and asked what they were filming. He replied that it was for his business' website [...] but introduced himself as Dan Safier and his business as the Prado Group. [...] With confirmation that this was in fact a corporate shoot, I informed him of CAMP's policy of 'no commercial, for-profit, and/or corporate' usage of the murals. Like most folks who hear this, he didn't understand what I meant since the alley is a public space. [...] Everything I said seemed foreign, or rather silly and flowery to this group, as they had varying degrees of smirks on their faces while I gave them some background on the 'magical alley' they had discovered. [...] It was yet another moment that has become all too familiar in San Francisco; a moment of contemporary colonialism in which a privileged few have discovered a new space that they want to claim as their own via the image it can provide as their marketing tool for profit. A space, that rather than getting to know the background of, and giving the respect due to those who have put the time, energy, and love into creating its allure, is viewed as a disposable commodity to use and exploit."


Developing divisions – Thousands of housing units are coming to market, but not many San Franciscans can afford them (San Francisco Bay Guardian, November 19, 2013)

"In many ways, 38 Dolores is pretty typical of the new housing opening in this part of town these days. It took seven years to complete the project, 'on time and under budget in a way this community can be proud of,' developer Dan Safier of The Prado Group told the assembled crowd. [...] 'They basically did a bait and switch. It was a real bullshit move,' [Peter] Cohen told the Guardian, noting how desperate the city is for more affordable housing now. 'The bottom line is they promised to do affordable housing on site and they didn't do it.' "